The Ugandan School, Nyakasura, where male students wear ‘skirts’

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The Ugandan School, Nyakasura, where male students wear ‘skirts’

Social media users have taken notice of a Ugandan school after the administration let male pupils to wear skirts as part of the uniform.

In a recent interview, Frank Manyindo, the principal of Nyakasura Secondary School, revealed that the male pupils had become used to school dress and no longer find it odd.

Every student views the kilt as standard dress. A kilt, belt, knee-socks, and a cuff known as a kilt hose are all part of the uniform set. Additionally, the lads dress their legs in scarlet leg warmers, he continued.

Manyindo claims that it is part of the institution’s culture for male students to wear the clothing.

A Scottish missionary named Lieutenant-Commander Ernest William Eborhard Calwell founded the institution in 1926 after originally persuading the Buganda Kingdom to adopt Scottish culture.

However, the king objected, compelling him to go.

However, the missionary was welcomed in Nyakasura, where he established a school and encouraged the locals to adopt Scottish culture.

Boys that wear the clothing become more self-assured and emerge as powerful leaders. The principal continued, “It has a distinct identity.

He justified the outfit by claiming that, contrary to popular belief, it is a kilt, a traditional garment worn by males in the Scottish Highlands.

In the British Isles, the kilt is the sole national costume that is worn regularly and not just on special occasions. Kilts have historically been worn in combat, not to mention during World War II, and the highland dress is also the uniform of Scottish regiments in the British army.

Mr. Manyindo stressed that despite the ridicule from the community, the pupils appreciate their outfits because they make them stand out.

Being a mixed-gender school, many report they have a difficult time telling the difference between males and girls when they first arrive.

The guys also have little pouches attached to the front of their kilts that they use to store necessities like pencils and handkerchiefs.

The lads said the kilt is a staple of the school’s culture, and they feel at ease with it when asked about their opinions of the required attire.

The majority claimed that despite the insults and criticism they frequently receive from peers at other schools for donning “girls’ uniform,” they saw nothing wrong with their clothing.

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